Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Specs and Review [1997-2002]


The Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was a famous mountain snowmobile manufactured from 1997 through 2002. Like its big brother, the Mountain Max 700, this sled was also known for its reliability and durability. If you want to find out more about this iconic machine, this post is for you.

We at PowerSportsGuide have compiled all you need to know into this Yamaha Mountain Max 600 review!

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Review

The first Yamaha sleds with Mountain Max nameplates appeared on the snow in the 1996 model year. However, they were actually not part of the “real” Mountain Max (MM) family.

Instead, these models were variations on the popular VMAX series, namely the VMAX-4 Mountain Max (VX800STW) and the VMAX 600 Mountain Max (VX600STW).

The all-new Yamaha “MM” – Mountain Max line was available from 1997 through 2004 and consisted of three different models:

  • Yamaha Mountain Max 600 (MM600) –  Manufactured: 1997-2002
  • Yamaha Mountain Max 700 (MM700) Manufactured: 1997-2004
  • Yamaha Mountain Max 800 (MM800) – Manufactured: Only in 1997

The Mountain Max 800 was available only in the 1997 model year, but the 600 and 700 remained in production for several years. Both of these machines were known for their great performance, which made them popular among off-trail riders.

The ‘97-‘99 Yamaha Mountain Max 600 engine was a liquid-cooled 598cc, 2-stroke, 2-cylinder power mill that cranked out about 95 HP at 7800 RPM. After three years of production, this unit was replaced with a liquid-cooled, 593cc, 3-cylinder engine that produced about 98-100 HP at 8500 RPM.

Because of this, the post-1999 model was known as the “Mountain Max 600 triple” while its predecessor was often referred to as the “Mountain Max 600 twin.”

This sled not only got an engine upgrade in 2000, but it also had many innovative features like a more advanced skid and suspensions. This innovative ProAction Mountain rear suspension system ensured excellent floatation and handling.

The new model also utilized a bigger 141” x 15” x 2” track, while its predecessor was propelled by a 136” x 15” x 1.5” track. This deep lug track design ensured an excellent bite in powder.

Thanks to these features, the Max 600 had excellent climbing abilities and could handle the most challenging mountain trails without any issues. On top of that, it had excellent gas mileage as well!

The Mountain Max 600 was discontinued in 2002 and two years later the entire MM family was ceased.

But to the delight of many fans, Yamaha brought back the 2-stroke Mountain Max in the 2021 season!

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Problems

But let’s face it, every sled has its weak points, and the Mountain Max 600 was no exception.

In a nutshell, the most common problems with the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 were as follows:

  • Smart Carb issues
  • T.O.R.S. malfunctions
  • Defective front suspension ski columns (Recall on the ‘97 and ‘98 models)
  • Water pump sealing issues (on the early models)
  • Lack of reverse gear and passenger seat

Many riders say that the biggest problem with the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was its Smart Carb issues.

It is also good to know that the 1997 and 1998 Mountain Max 600 had a recall due to its potentially defective ski columns. The welds on these columns proved to be weak, so Yamaha decided to issue an official recall on them.

Another common problem with the Mountain Max 600 was the T.O.R.S malfunctions, but this system could be easily fixed.

Finally, we can’t forget that this model lacked a reverse and was designed to carry only one rider.

Apart from these minor issues, the Mountain Max 600 was one of the most reliable 2-stroke sleds built around the Millennium.

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Specs Chart

For your convenience, we’ve compiled the key specs of the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 into these charts:

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Engine Specs

Engine Specs 1997-1999 2000-2002
Engine type Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, 7-port Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, 7-port
Cylinder Arrangement Parallel 2-cylinder Parallel 3-cylinder
Engine stroke 2 2
Cooling system Liquid-cooled Liquid-cooled
Bore x Stroke (“) 2.94 x 2.68 2.56 x 2.35
Displacement (cc) 598 593
Horsepower 95 (Approximately) 98-100  (Approximately)
Idle speed (r/min) 1600 +/- 100 1600 +/- 100
Carburetor Mikuni TM36 x 2 Mikuni TM31 x 3
Turbocharged No No
Engine oil type YAMALUBE 2-cycle oil YAMALUBE 2-cycle oil
Fuel type Unleaded gasoline. Pump octane (R+M)/2; 88 or higher Unleaded gasoline. Pump octane (R+M)/2; 88 or higher
Starting system Manual with recoil starter Manual with recoil starter

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Dimensions

Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Length (“) 116.9 116.9 117.7 117.7 117.7
Width (“) 45.5 45.5 43.9 43.9 43.9
Height (“) 46.7 48 47.8 47.8 47.8
Ski tread (“) 38.6 38.6 38.6 38.6 38.6
Fuel tank capacity (gal.) 11.9 11.7 11.7 11.7 11.7
Oil tank capacity (qt.) 2.5 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Weight Chart

Dry weight (lbs)/Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Mountain Max 600 558 514 511 511 516

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Track Features

Track type Molded rubber, fiberglass rod reinforced
Track dimensions ’97-’99 (“) 136” x 15” x 1.5”
Track dimensions ’00-’02 (“) 141” x 15” x 2”
Track deflection ’97-’99 (“) 0.98 – 1.18 / 100 N {22lbs}
Length on ground ’97-’99 (“) 37.2
Track deflection ’00-’02 (“) 0.79-0.98 / 100 N {22lbs}
Length on ground ’00-’02 (“) 34.9
Suspension type Slide rail suspension
Drive sprocket Quadruple polyethylene, 9 teeth

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Electric Features

Ignition system CDI
Spark plug type ’97-’99 BR9ECS (NGK)
Spark plug type ’00-’02 BR9ES (NGK)
Spark plug gap 0.028 – 0.031 in (0.7-0.8 mm)

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Features and Accessories

Clutch CVT
Primary Drive Belt
Drive chain Silent chain enclosed in oil bath
Reverse No
Front suspension type Independent double wishbone
Suspension type Slide rail suspension
Ignition CDI
Break type Hydraulic disc brake (ventillated)
Track Molded rubber, fiberglass rod reinforced
Break operation Handle lever (left hand)
Throttle operation Handle lever (right hand)
Chassis material Aluminum
Body Material Plastic
Rider capacity 1

Source: Yamaha Owner’s Manuals. These charts are for informational purposes only! For exact specifications, please refer to the factory manual.

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 Top Speed

The top speed of the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was about 80-90 mph under ideal conditions. In contrast, the trail performance SRX 600 hit 105-110 mph, while the flagship SRX 700 reached an impressive 110-115 mph.

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 vs. Mountain Max 700

Let’s compare these two legendary Yamaha mountain sleds by the numbers!

Model Mountain Max 600 Mountain Max 600 Mountain Max 700
Year 1997-1999 2000-2002 1997-2004
Engine type Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, 7-port Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, 7-port Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, 7-port
Cylinder Arrangement Parallel 2-cylinder Parallel 3-cylinder Parallel 3-cylinder
Engine stroke 2 2 2
Cooling system Liquid-cooled Liquid-cooled Liquid-cooled
Bore x Stroke (“) 2.94 x 2.68 2.56 x 2.35 2.78 x 2.35
Displacement (cc) 598 593 698
Horsepower 95 (Approximately) 95 (Approximately) 115 (Approximately)
Idle speed (r/min) 1600 +/- 100 1600 +/- 100 1600 +/- 100
Carburetor Mikuni TM36 x 2 Mikuni TM31 x 3 Mikuni TM33 x 3
Turbocharged No No No

Yamaha Mountain Max 600 For Sale

Surprisingly, the Mountain Max 600s are still popular in the second-hand market.

These vintage machines are far cheaper and easier to maintain than the newest sleds equipped with a lot of bells and whistles. The best choices are arguably the 2000-2002 models with the stronger triple engine and the new skid.

If you’re considering buying one, you can find a vintage Yamaha Mountain Max 600 for sale on Craigslist, eBay, Snowmobilesoup, Sledswap, Snowmobiletrader, and other snowmobile ad sites.

Also, you can’t go wrong by visiting some Yamaha SXR snowmobile forums and FB groups!

Takeaway – FAQs About the Vintage Yamaha Mountain Max 600

What year did the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 come out?

The Yamaha Mountain Max 600 came out in 1996 and was available from the 1997 model year.

What years was the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 made?

The Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was manufactured from 1997 through 2002.

What size was a Yamaha Mountain Max 600?

The ‘97-‘99 Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was 108.7 inches long, 47.2 inches wide, and 48.4 inches high. By 2000, the model was redesigned, so the ‘00-‘02 Mountain Max 600 was now 117.7 inches long, 43.9 inches wide, and 47.8 inches high.

What was the track size for the Yamaha Mountain Max 600?

The stock track sizes of the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 models were as follows:

  • ‘97-‘99 Yamaha Mountain Max 600 track size: 136” x 15” x 1.5”
  • ’00-‘02 Yamaha Mountain Max 600 track size: 141” x 15” x 2”

How much did a Yamaha Mountain Max 600 weigh?

The early (‘97-‘98) Mountain Max 600 models weighed 558 pounds, while the ‘99-‘02 models were significantly lighter at about 511-516 pounds.

What kind of engine was in the Yamaha Mountain Max 600?

It’s a lesser-known fact that the Mountain Max 600 was manufactured with two completely different engines. The ‘97-‘99 Mountain Max 600 had a 598cc, 2-stroke, 2-cylinder engine, while the ‘00-‘02 model was powered by a 593cc, 2-stroke, 3-cylinder power mill. Both units were liquid-cooled and featured flat slide Mikuni carburetors.

How much horsepower did a Yamaha Mountain Max 600 have?

The ‘97-‘99 Yamaha Mountain Max 600 “Twin” had about 95 HP, while the ‘00-‘02 model had about 98-100 HP thanks to its more powerful triple engine.

How fast was a Yamaha Mountain Max 600?

The top speed of the Yamaha Mountain Max 600 was about 80-90 mph, depending on environmental conditions.

References:

Yamaha Motor

Off-road.com

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