Fox Trac Snowmobile for Sale: Where can You Find One? [+History]


Fox Trac snowmobiles were manufactured in Wisconsin from late 1963 through 1974. The company primarily focused on the family market but also built many great industrial and racing sleds over the years. Besides snowmobiles, Fox Corporation designed and produced various powersport vehicles like dirt bikes, mini bikes, and go-karts. If you want to learn all about vintage Fox Trac snowmobiles and find out where you can still find one, you are in the right place.

We at PowerSportsGuide have compiled all you need to know about these iconic machines under one roof!

Fox Trac Snowmobile History

The history of Fox Trac snowmobiles goes back to the early 1960s. At that time, the Wisconsin-based Fox Go-Boy Carts Inc. was looking for other opportunities to keep their facility busy through the off-season.

The company produced go-karts, motorcycles, golf carts, and industrial machines, so expanding its offering with snowmobiles seemed like a great idea.

At that time, winter activities like ice fishing and visiting mountain cabins were gaining in popularity, so the demand for snowmobiles was increasing year after year.

Fox grabbed the opportunity and started working on a snowmobile prototype in 1962.

After two years of designing and engineering, production of Fox Trac snowmobiles began in October 1963. The sleds were built in the Fox Body Co. plant in Janesville, Wisconsin, which produced about 600 units for the first model year.

The 1964 Fox Trac snowmobile lineup featured six different models. From the smallest Ice Cycle 130 to the high-end model 510, prices of the machines varied widely, as did their dimensions.

The smallest model was the 1964 Fox Trac Ice Cycle 130, which was available for $200. This tiny sled featured a unique β€œtrike-like” design as they had two skis in back with a spiked wheel propulsion between them.

It also had a ski in front that could be steered with a handlebar.

The skis featured V edges while the innovative turning mechanism tilted them in the direction of the turn. This prevented drift in the turns and resulted in an outstanding riding experience.

Surprisingly, this snowmobile had a motorcycle-like twist grip throttle and was powered by a 3 HP Briggs engine.

This machine was less than 30 inches wide and had a towing capacity of 200 pounds. The top speed of the sled was 15 mph and it carried 0.75 gallons of gas.

Thanks to its small dimensions, this model easily fit into a family station wagon.

The larger Fox snowmobiles were designed for commercial purposes and were available with 6-10 HP Kohler engines.

They featured a car-like steering wheel, electric start, and brake. What’s more, certain models were available with reverse gear, which were among the first in the industry.

Unlike the Ice Cycle, these machines had two front skis and were powered by a caterpillar track, which utilized a revolutionary slide system.

While competitors still used maple wood slides, Fox Trac sleds were manufactured with double-molded DuPont β€œDelrin” slides.

The largest model in the family was the 2-seater 1964 Fox Trac 510. This sled featured a 10 HP Kohler engine, lights for night use, and a 7-gallon fuel tank. Riders also appreciated the remarkable 1,000-pound towing capacity and the amazing 30 mph top speed.

Sales went well and almost the entire lineup was sold out before the end of 1963.

What’s more, shifting to snow vehicles resulted in a more rounded operation, so annual employment was almost constant. In the previous years, the manufacturer employed about 100 people through the summers which dropped to about 40 for the winters.

It’s safe to say that the early snowmobiles were primarily used for work purposes, but throughout the β€˜60s they were quickly transformed into play machines.

In 1965 the three separate corporations, namely the Fox Go-Boy Carts Inc., the Fox Body Corporation, and the Fox Realty Corporation were merged into one company.

The new organization, called Fox Corporation, produced the same products as before. Besides this transformation, Fox entered into a cooperation agreement with the Japanese firm Kawasaki.

Because of its large dealer network, the company was selected as the official distributor of Kawasaki motorcycles in many states.

Employment remained relatively consistent at about 60-75 people and the facility had a capacity of 40 sleds per day. The machines were marketed throughout the U.S. in the snow belt and Canada, but some of them were exported to Europe as well.

The 1965 Fox Trac lineup contained four models with nine engine options from 3 up to 16 HP. Prices ranged from $200 to $2,000.

The sleds were already marketed by the separate Fox Sales Co., which targeted three markets; recreation, family, and commercial.

By 1966, the lineup was rounded up to ten models. The smallest Ice Cycle 130C was still available while the track-powered Fox Trac models came with 6-16 HP engine options.

For the 1967 model year, the innovative Fox Trac RT family was introduced. These new sleds featured an β€œOlympic bobsled styling,” rubber tracks, and high-performance JLO engines, which were mounted on the front.

The Fox Trac RT 250 was defined as an all-purpose family snowmobile. Its 247cc JLO engine cranked out 11 HP at 5000 RPM, which resulted in a top speed of 35 mph.

In contrast, the big brother RT 300 was able to reach an amazing 45 mph, thanks to its 292cc JLO engine, HR carburetion, and tuned muffler. The commercial units still utilized a rear-engine design and were available with Kohler, JLO, and Lauson engines.

In the 1968 model year, Fox sleds were classed by their track dimensions. The agile β€œ15-wide” RT family was powered by 10-20 HP engines and offered excellent maneuverability and responsive control.

In contrast, the more stable WT line featured a 22” track and was available exclusively with 18 and 20 HP engines.

These machines were marketed as β€œdual-purpose snowmobiles,” as the manufacturer recommended them for both recreational and work purposes. The commercial line already had one sled in this year, the Fox Trac 512C.

Because of the unbroken popularity of Fox sleds, sales increased by 50% in 1969. Besides the sleds the manufacturer produced a lot of great snowmobile accessories as well.

Although the brand was known for its family-friendly machines and work sleds, to satisfy customers the 1969 Fox Trac Spoiler was placed in the racing class.

This racing sled featured a 55 HP engine and could hit an incredible 90 mph under optimal conditions.

Regarding family sleds, the Futura line had a 15” track and 12.5-35 HP engine options, while the Centura line got a 20” track and 18-21 HP engines.

After some great seasons, the early β€˜70s were hard years for the entire snowmobile industry. Mild winters and rising oil prices led to low sales numbers.

Fox made every effort to stay afloat but finally ceased its snowmobile division after the 1973 season.

Fox Trac Snowmobile Models

For your convenience, we’ve compiled some of the most popular vintage Fox Trac snowmobiles into one list:

1964 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1964 Ice Cycle 130 – Engine: 3 HP Briggs
  • 1964 Fox Trac 140 – Engine: 4 HP Briggs
  • 1964 Fox Trac 360 – Engine: 6 HP Kohler
  • 1964 Fox Trac 380 – Engine: 8 HP Kohler
  • 1964 Fox Trac 510 – Engine: 10 HP Kohler

1965 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1965 Ice Cycle 130B – Engine: 3 HP Briggs
  • 1965 Fox Trac 140B – Engine: 4 HP Briggs
  • 1965 Fox Trac 260B – Engine: 6 HP
  • 1965 Fox Trac 380B – Engine: 8 HP Kohler
  • 1965 Fox Trac 410B – Engine: 10 HP
  • 1965 Fox Trac 510B – Engine: 10 HP Kohler

1966 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1966 Ice Cycle 130C – Engine: 3 HP Briggs
  • 1966 Fox Trac 160C – Engine: 6 HP Lauson
  • 1966 Fox Trac 260C – Engine: 6 HP Lauson
  • 1966 Fox Trac 280C – Engine: 8 HP Kohler
  • 1966 Fox Trac RT10 – Engine: 10 HP JLO
  • 1966 Fox Trac 380C – Engine: 8 HP Kohler
  • 1966 Fox Trac 412C – Engine: 12 HP Kohler
  • 1966 Fox Trac 512C – Engine: 12 HP Kohler
  • 1966 Fox Trac 512CE – Engine: 12 HP Kohler
  • 1966 Fox Trac 512BE – Engine: 16 HP Onan

1967 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1967 Fox Trac 160C – Engine: 6 HP Lauson
  • 1967 Fox Trac 260C – Engine: 6 HP Lauson
  • 1967 Fox Trac 412C – Engine: 12 HP Kohler
  • 1967 Fox Trac 512C – Engine: 12 HP Kohler
  • 1967 Fox Trac RT-250 – Engine: 10 HP JLO
  • 1967 Fox Trac RT-300 – Engine: 15 HP JLO
  • 1967 Fox Trac RT-X40 – Engine: 21 HP JLO

1968 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1968 Fox Trac RT-250 – Engine: 10 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac RT-300 – Engine: 15 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac RT-350 – Engine: 18 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac RT-400 – Engine: 20 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac WT-450 – Engine: 18 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac WT-450E – Engine: 18 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac WT-500 – Engine: 20 HP JLO
  • 1968 Fox Trac WT-512C – Engine: 12 HP Kohler

1969 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1969 Fox Trac Centura 297 – Engine: 297cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Centura 380 – Engine: 380cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 227 – Engine: 227cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 297 – Engine: 297cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 300 – Engine: 300cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 380 – Engine: 380cc JLO
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 493 – Engine: 493cc Hirth
  • 1969 Fox Trac Futura 634 – Engine: 634cc Hirth
  • 1969 Fox Trac Special – Engine: 292cc JLO

1970 Fox Trac Lineup

  • 1970 Fox Trac Futura 295 – Engine: 20.5 HP, 295cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Futura 340 – Engine: 23.5 HP, 340cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Futura 399 – Engine: 26 HP, 399cc Kohler
  • 1970 Fox Trac Centura 340 – Engine: 23.5 HP, 340cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Centura 399 – Engine: 26 HP, 399cc Kohler
  • 1970 Fox Trac Centura 440 – Engine: 28 HP, 440cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Spoiler FX 399 – Engine: 26 HP, 399cc Kohler
  • 1970 Fox Trac Spoiler FX 440 – Engine: 28 HP, 440cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Spoiler FX 760 – Engine: 55 HP, 760cc JLO
  • 1970 Fox Trac Special 292 – Engine: 292cc JLO

1971 Fox Trac Lineup:

  • 1971 Fox Trac Special – Engine: 20.5 HP, 295cc JLO
  • 1971 Fox Trac Futura 340 – Engine: 23.5 HP, 340cc JLO
  • 1971 Fox Trac Futura 399 – Engine: 26 HP, 399cc Kohler

1972 Fox Trac Lineup:

  • 1972 Fox Trac Futura 295 – Engine: 20.5 HP, 295cc JLO
  • 1972 Fox Trac Futura 340 – Engine: 23.5 HP, 340cc JLO
  • 1972 Fox Trac Futura 399 – Engine: 26 HP, 399cc Kohler

Vintage Fox Trac Snowmobiles for Sale

Vintage Fox Trac snowmobiles are popular choices among vintage sled enthusiasts and private collectors. If you are lucky you can see one on the trails or even in vintage races.

If you’re looking for one, the good news is that you can still find a vintage Fox Trac snowmobile for sale on Craigslist, eBay, Snowmobiletrader, and other special sled classified ad sites.

What’s more, you can also find some good deals on Fox Trac snowmobile forums and Facebook groups.

Conclusion

Vintage Fox Trac snowmobiles were well known for their innovative solutions and unique design. Most of the models were marketed for families and commercial use. However, the sporty Fox Trac Spoiler line was built for racing purposes.

Fox snowmobiles were very popular machines, this is why they were in production from 1963 to 1973. It’s a lesser-known fact that Elvis Presley owned one of these iconic sleds!

Unlike many of its competitors, Fox is still in business and manufactures shocks and accessories.

References:

Farm Show Magazine

http://www.vintagesnowmobiles.50megs.com/BROCHURES.html

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